We are very sorry to announce the following news, but our annual underground Diversity in Place film festival won’t take place this year.

 

It was an hard decision to make and we really want to thank you for your submission.

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Screen Shot 2012-12-16 at 5.27.54 AMDecember 2012 | The Diversity in Place Film Initiative opens up its 5th annual international call for short films on URBAN UPRISINGS.

“In the wake of the 2008 explosion of the current economic crisis, more and more people are actively fighting to restore what they’ve lost. Not since the ‘60s have so many people across the globe taken to the streets to demand a more just and democratic society, access to housing, health care, education, food, jobs, a clean and safe environment and lives free from police violence. Most of these uprisings are rooted in the urban landscape. Many of their demands imply a major transformation in the way our cities work.”

Share with us your stories of urban uprisings, current and alternative visions of how to build new communities and a new city, and the current work being done toward this end.

The Diversity in Place Film Fest will take place in Honolulu, Hawai‘i, June 16, 2013.

SUBMISSION DEADLINE

April 20, 2013.

GUIDELINES

We accept any short film, narrative, experimental, animated or documentary under 30 minutes in length.

  • Please upload your film on http://www.vimeo.com and send us the link. If you don’t want to go public, vimeo gives you the option to keep your film private. Privacy options are available so you can have complete control over who sees your videos.  To share the password-protected video, you can send an email to diversityinplace@gmail.com with the password inside.
  • Fill the online submission form

ENTRY FEES

Standard Fee: $15
Student Fee: $10

Please make check payable to Hawai`i Academy of Performing Arts (HAPA) and send to: Diversity in Place Film Festival, attn: Vera HWF c/o The ARTS at Marks Garage, 1159 Nu`uanu Avenue, Honolulu,  Hawai`i l 96817-5121 l Phone: 808.206.0848 l Fax: 808.521.2923l Email diversityinplace@gmail.com
Online payment available.  Standard &  StudentPlease note that there will be a $2 convenience fee included on all online payments.

NOTIFICATION DATE

Approximately May 1, 2013

ABOUT THE FESTIVAL

The festival, which was firstly organized 4 years ago, stems from the attempt to create fruitful intersections between Urban Planning and Filmmaking, as a research methodology, way of knowing and disseminating knowledge about how people live in and experience place. It’s an hybrid event, thought originally in a conference format, and posted as such on more academic circles, especially in its very first reiterations, but then aimed at reaching filmmakers -out of academic circles- interested in the annual theme. We usually post a call -like for a conference, but instead of papers, we ask to submit films on the theme selected for that year.

At the festival, we host introductory notes/lectures by researchers who in the field this initiative was born, i.e. planning/urban studies, have used film in their work. Once again, it is an hybrid event, born in an academic environment to use filmmaking for social research -especially in light of how extensively film is used in the classroom, and increasingly as a research output (and not only in film-related fields) too. An outlet as well a venue where to gather and converse about the films and through the films about issues related to place, placemaking, multicultural cities, diversity, and right to the city to cite few, across disciplinary and professional boundaries.

For more information, please send us an email to diversityinplace@gmail.com

Aloha! Thank you all for coming. This was one of the most well attended festival so far!

The call for next year will be out in October 2012, stay tuned!!!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

some of the films are available here.

HONOLULU -The Diversity in Place Shorts Fest presents a wide variety of short films from a variety of hidden, hard to access, abandoned or simply unfinished places. A day in the life of an abandoned New Jersey Papermill, a journey through some of the most difficult hidden locations in London in Crack the Surface, a Bitter Coffee in the streets of Damascus, or a visit to a 1860’s coal mine in Belgium, in Hasard de Cheratte. Streets of contemporary Tokyo in Edo, underground trains, streetcars, buses and escalators embody the impressionistic beauty of architectural reflections in Arcs of Texture, a May Day in Community China, and Italy’s most prominent architectural style between the end of WW2 and the present day, a foray into the Unfinished Italy. These and many more urban explorations into the beauty of the everyday, the off-limits, abandoned, forgotten and unfinished.
Complete program can be found here.

Light refreshment will be offered during intermission thanks to the generosity of the UH Graduate Student Organization. Website: www.diversityinplace.org

This event is organized by Hawai‘i Women in Filmmaking in collaboration with The ARTS at Marks Garage.

Contact: Vera Zambonelli vera@artsatmarks.com 808.206.0848
1159 Nu‘uanu Avenue, Honolulu, HI 96817

The program can be found here.

The 4th Annual International DIVERSITY IN PLACE FILM FESTIVAL (DIPFF) returns once again to Honolulu, Hawai`i! This year we ask you to submit films on URBAN EXPLORATIONS. Tell us stories about the existing, yet unseen places in or around the urban areas you live/d, visit/ed, encounter/ed. The notion of urban exploration usually entails this sense of off-limits, abandoned, forgotten and neglected places. However, these places, as Josh Clark writes, were once “created with people in mind; they’re constructed to serve some function that benefits us. But [once] abandoned, these sites cease to have any sort of purpose. By gazing upon these structures as art or historical monuments, urban explorers give them a new purpose.” Hence, our call invites you to leave your “normal” world, venture and wonder through less usual paths. Please share with us your stories of encountering, examining, infiltrating, appropriating the normally unseen or off-limits parts of the urban areas around you. Imagine and image for us what you encounter and what there was once to be seen.

UPCOMING DEADLINE

February 1, 2012 –

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

  • We accept any short film, narrative, experimental, animated or documentary under 30 minutes in length
  • Please upload your film on http://www.vimeo.com and send us the link. If you don’t want to go public, vimeo gives you the option to keep your film private. Privacy options are available so you can have complete control over who sees your videos.  To share the password-protected video, you can send an email to diversityinplace@gmail.com with the password inside.
  • Fill the online submission form

ENTRY FEES

Standard Fee: 25$

Student Fee: $20

Please make check payable to Hawai`i Academy of Performing Arts (HAPA) and send to: Diversity in Place Film Festival, c/o The ARTS at Marks Garage, 1159 Nu`uanu Avenue, Honolulu,  Hawai`i l 96817-5121 l Phone: 808.206.0848 l Fax: 808.521.2923l Email diversityinplace@gmail.com

Online payment available.  Standard &  Student. Please note that there will be a $2 convenience fee included on all online payments.

For entries paying the Student Fee, a copy of a current student ID MUST be included with the submission.

NOTIFICATION DATE
Approximately 1-March-2012

ABOUT THE FESTIVAL

DIPFF, an intersection between a film festival and a conference, explores the potential applications of film as one of the most ideal formats through which we can understand people’s relations with place and promote awareness and a critical outlook on how we, all of us, experience place so as to have a better understanding of how it works, affects people’s lives and people intervene in its making. Held each April in Honolulu, Hawaii, DIPFF presents a wide variety of films from emerging and professional filmmakers. Different from an usual film festival, it is not only themed, but  also hosts a keynote speaker who will give an introductory lecture, and the filmmakers are invited to discuss extensively their work during the Q&A session. Yet, though following this conference format, instead of asking for papers, we call for films and videos as visual essays on the yearly theme.

Contact person: Vera Zambonelli (Founder and Creative Director)

“Diversity In Place” Film Festival.

Hawai’i is recognized as the most diverse state in the nation, but the rest of the U.S., as well as urban centers worldwide, are following our lead. Urban and regional planners are looking at how attitudes and the built environment encourage or discourage this trend. HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on an upcoming film series that explores the issues. The 3rd Annual “Diversity in Place” film series opens April 28th at the UH Manoa Center for Hawaiian Studies. The films continue Friday April 29th at Marks’ Garage. Check www.diversityinplace.org for information and a full schedule.

Aired today {April 19} on 88.1 FM at 7:30 am and 8:30 pm & 89.3 FM between 8-9 am and at 1:30 pm

audio file: audio/mpeg icondive0419.mp3

APRIL 28-29, 2011 Honolulu Hawaii 

Honolulu, HI (April 7, 2011) – The 3rd Annual Diversity in Place Film Festival <<Cosmopolis at the Grassroots>> showcases films that explore the inevitably increasing diverse social and built environment we live in and the role that place plays in enabling and/or constraining the emergence of cosmopolitan practices to occur, develop and be nurtured. This two-day event consists of screening and discussions on Thursday April 28, from 6:30 to 8:30 at the Kamakakūokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies, 2645 Dole Street, and Friday April 29, from 5:00 to 8:00 (doors open at 4:45) at the ARTS at Marks Garage, 1159 Nuuanu Avenue, in downtown Honolulu.

On April 28th, the first day of the film fest, we will be featuring Finding Our Way, A documentary film with and about the Burns Lake band and the Cheslatta Carrier Nation, two First Nations bands located in north central BC, Canada directed by Leonie Sandercock and Giovanni Attili. Finding Our Way questions how non-metropolitan communities that have been divided, indeed segregated, along Native/non-Native lines for more than a hundred years can find their way towards reconciliation, reparation, and productive co-existence.

The second day, April 29th, we will begin by screening the shorts film submissions’ selection, which presents a wide variety of stories from a variety of places. From Bonnington Square set right in the heart of London, where in the early eighties the one hundred houses of the Square were all squatted, forming a bohemian community from all around the world, to the exotic fruit and vegetables at Brighton Oriental Food Store and Iceland mini-mart’s cheap and cheerful offerings, a market place that brings together products and people from all corners of the world and acts as an arena of cross-cultural pollination embodied in the daily ritual of food buying.

But also, Kona’s (Honolulu, Oahu) painful transformation in He Aha Ka Waiwai?, and the Genderbusters drive around resolving the gender-binary dilemmas of folks all over San Francisco. One Storey makes us reflect on the effects of displacement upon intimate relations, while Life in Bubbles portrays the dilemma and the inner-struggle of those who were born into a privileged position in a state that fails to provide social amenities, justice or peace for the majority of its people in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Then, we will feature Imagining Home by Sue Arbuthnot & Richard Wilhelm, a film that traces the complete transformation of Columbia Villa, a historic, cherished, and maligned Portland, Oregon public housing neighborhood enduring poverty, gang violence, and racial discrimination—yet hoping for a new chance.

On both evenings, a moderated discussion led by Vera Zambonelli with filmmakers Leonie Sandercock, Sue Arbuthnot and Richard Wilhelm follows the screening.

The festival is free and open to the public.

This event is made possible thanks to the generosity of the University of Hawai’i Diversity and Equity Initiative, the UHM GRC Livable Cities and Digital Media Studio, The ARTS at Marks Garage, The UH Department of Urban and Regional Planning, the UH Graduate Student Organization, and the University Students of Urban and Regional Planning. For further info, contact Vera at veraz@hawaii.edu.

For complete screening program, click here.

APRIL 28-29, 2011 Cosmopolitanism as a mode of practice and competence involves the ability of individuals to navigate different cultures and their respective systems of meanings. Yet rarely is the role that place plays explicitly considered as being crucial for the emergence of this mode of practice and competence to occur, develop and be nurtured.  Hence, though cosmopolitanism does not happen in a vacuum, it is usually abstracted from everyday life and usually associated with elite traveling across several borders.

Alternatively, this year call intends to solicit films that look at very localized forms of cosmopolitanism and tell stories of everyday experiences of cosmopolitanism as they occur in our everyday spaces and places. Cosmopolis at the Grassroots asks for films that raise awareness of the inevitably increasing diverse social and built environment we live in -a view from the grassroots- as to document and value the everyday creative efforts towards the making of Cosmopolis of familiar places where we, all of us, can be at home.

In an innovative way toward mutual learning, this event, an intersection between a film festival and a conference, explores the potential applications of film as one of the most ideal formats through which we can understand people’s relations with place. Different from an usual film festival, it is not only themed, but  also hosts a keynote speaker who will give an introductory lecture, and the filmmakers are invited to discuss extensively their work during the Q&A session. Yet, though following this conference format, instead of asking for papers, we call for films and videos as visual essays on this year theme.

This event reaches out to scholars, teachers, students and practitioners alike who are searching for alternative methods to conventional data analysis and academic writing to create, investigate, manage, and disseminate knowledge.

On how to submit, please click here

This initiative is led by Vera Zambonelli, Associate Director of the Filmmaking for Social Research Program at the Globalization Research Center, University of Hawai’i at Manoa.

Fur further info, please contact us: diversityinplace@gmail.com

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